Meet MOTHER TERESA - Humanitarian of the 20th Century

Missionary - Nobel Laureate Founder of the Missionaries of Charity Servant of the poorest of the poor - Lover of Jesus

The woman called a “living Saint,” while feeding the destitute and dying on the streets of Calcutta, founded a new order of Catholic sisters called The Missionaries of Charity who today number over 4,500 in 133 countries.  Rather than a saint, this humble Albanian nun referred to herself as simply, “a pencil in the hand of God.”
In this multimedia drama, Rev. Gwen Ehrenborg recounts the life of Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu  from her obscure hometown village of Skopje to her influences upon Popes and national leaders throughout the world.  Receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in l979, this intelligent, small-framed woman has addressed prestigious lecture halls, governmental and international gatherings with her controversial religious opinions, yet raised more money for relieving poverty world-wide than any other humanitarian. Using Mother Theresa’s own words, the program addresses the questions as to why she entered the slums, what kept her going, and what she learned from the poorest of the poor.  “Mother” still has much to say to us today.

“The dying, the cripple, the unwanted, the unloved, these are Jesus in disguise."  Mother Teresa


ABOUT THE PRESENTATION - "Mother Teresa - In Her Own Words"

The performance recounts the life of an Albanian nun who pricked the conscious of the world about the plight of the poor, with nothing but love and a mission to fight what she called the world's great disease-- not leprosy, AIDS or even poverty, but the feeling of being unwanted and abandoned by mankind.    
Queried at a news conference in Charleston, South Carolina as to what she thought about people saying she was a living saint, Mother Teresa replied, "Please, let me die first!"   Joy-filled with love and tenacious compassion, Mother Theresa founded a new order of Catholic sisters called the Missionaries of Charity who today number over 4,000 living in 475 Motherhouses in 180 countries feeding over 50,000 people every day while caring for 15,000 terminally ill each year. Rather than a saint, this humble nun referred to herself as "a pencil in the hand of God".  "We are not Social Workers," she taught her younger sisters, "when we feed the hungry and wash the leper, we do it for the love of God and that person."
Since receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979, this intelligent small-framed women has addressed more prestigious lecture halls, governments and international gatherings with her controversial religious opinions, yet raised more money for relieving poverty world-wide than any other humanitarian. Using Mother Theresa's own words, the program addresses the questions as to why she enters the slums, what kept her going, what she learned from the poorest of the poor, and what she has to say to people today.

image19

Mother Teresa - In Her Own Words

 “It is not how much we do, but how much love we put in the doing.  It is not how much we give, but how much love we put in the giving."    

 “The poor are very great people.  We have much to learn from them.” 

 “Nakedness is, not only need for clothing; nakedness is lack of human dignity, and lack of respect for each other.”

 “Yesterday is gone.  Tomorrow has not yet come.  We have only today.  Let us begin!” 

           "To me, Jesus is my God.

            Jesus is my Beloved.

            Jesus is my Life.

            Jesus is my All in all.

            Jesus is my Everything."    

“A life not lived for others is not a life.”